Towards a Directory for all OpenStack People

One of the challenges at large projects like OpenStack is to know people, understand who is doing what, how to reach out to them. There are a lot of different classes of people involved in OpenStack: developers, users, speakers and participants to conferences, voters for OpenStack Foundation’s official governing bodies, maintainers of company’s presence on…

Tracking gender diversity in the OpenStack developer community

The OpenStack Foundation has always tried to increase genders diversity in our community: we joined the Outreach Program for Women, established clear policies for our summits and in general we’ve been actively promoting good behavior across the board. A few weeks ago I realized that we were lacking of a decent way to track our…

Measuring Community Growth

The discussion held a few weeks ago at Community Leadership Summit around how to ‘measure’ open source projects were very interesting. There was even a keynote by David Eaves during OSCON about the topic (well worth 15 minutes of your time, watch it below). There are many people comparing different open source projects, I keep…

Measuring code contributions to Openstack

Following the rule “you cannot improve what you cannot measure” I started putting together a system to measure engagement in OpenStack community. There are lots of factors to take into account for engagement of members of a community. With OpenStack I started from code, I will keep adding other sources of data that will help…

Social Currency as a tool for community managers

I see a world of games, competitions, fun to be added to online communities using social currency platforms. Social currency is shared information that encourages further social encounters. It’s not a new concept, but the social web increases its prevalence. In the web-based collaboration software platform called Rypple, a simple act of thanking someone on…